Workers’ Memorial Day Refection: Love and Life Silenced by Mesothelioma

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Posted on April 25, 2012

Twenty-seven years ago, my loving husband, Alan, lifted my wedding veil over my eyes and embraced me forever. Unfortunately, forever came to an end too quickly. Mesothelioma stole my best friend, and I desperately want him back. Gone forever are his smiles, his “I love yous,” and the precious family time we would have had together. Memories of our love are eternally etched across my heart, but now, only the sounds of silence echo around me. Ironically, our anniversary and Workers’ Memorial Day share the same day. Alan had both occupational and environmental asbestos exposure, and he paid the ultimate toll for his job: his life.

My tale of love lost is mirrored by many of you around the world. There is no rewind button in our lives, we can only go forward and honor our loved ones with unwavering commitment to ending the deadly legacy of asbestos. For more than a century, asbestos has been known to cause disease, yet exposure continues, and the United States still imports asbestos for “manufacturing needs.” Now is the time for change, for sharing our stories, and supporting each other while we heal. I see the brightness of hope and hear Alan’s favorite Gershwin, song, “Our Love is Here to Stay.”

Join me this Saturday, April 28th, for Worker’s Memorial Day, as I will light a candle for Alan and for the countless others who have lost their lives engaging in their basic human right to safe and decent work. more than a century, asbestos has been known to cause disease, yet exposure continues, and the United States still imports asbestos for “manufacturing needs.”

In unity,

Linda

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