Preventing Asbestos Exposure: 7 Reasons for 7 Days – Linda Reinstein

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April 1st – Preventing Asbestos Exposure: 7 Reasons for 7 Days

By Linda Reinstein

To view content of all 7 days, please click here.

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) is thrilled to present the launch of our third Global Asbestos Awareness Week (GAAW)!    The week of April 1-7, 2012 is intended to raise awareness of asbestos and prevent asbestos-related disease, and involves collaboration amongst organizations and leading experts the world over.  As we all know, asbestos is still mined, imported, and used in both developing and developed countries around the world despite being confirmed as a human carcinogen.  The devastating health issues and diseases caused from exposure to asbestos represent a significant cost to society and an unbelievably painful experience for the individuals and families affected.  The only way to end the deadly legacy of asbestos is through education and awareness to prevent exposure and funding to find a cure for asbestos-related diseases.

Join us for Global Asbestos Awareness Week – a critical 7-day campaign to save lives and prevent exposure – by learning how asbestos impacts health, the environment, and the economy and by sharing with friends, family, and colleagues!   Feel free to Share Your Stories, write in about your experience, and utilize your social networks to share our content and blogs.  Together, we can make a difference!

Top 7 Reasons to Prevent Asbestos Exposure: 7 Reasons for 7 Days

  1. Asbestos is a proven human carcinogen and there is no safe level of exposure.
  2. Asbestos fibers can cause asbestosis, lung and gastrointestinal cancers, and an aggressive cancer called mesothelioma. The average life expectancy of a mesothelioma patient is six – twelve months.
  3. Asbestos diseases have a 10 – 50 year latency period from initial exposure to development of disease.
  4. Chrysotile asbestos accounts for nearly 95% of asbestos mined and exported today. The top five asbestos producing countries are Russia, China, Brazil, Kazakhstan, and Canada.
  5. 55 countries have banned asbestos, but the U.S. and Canada have not.
  6. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers die annually from exposure to asbestos. Asbestos has been mined and used in a broad range of products, materials, and applications including construction, insulation, shipyards, and many other industries.
  7. Asbestos fibers can be nearly 700 times smaller than human hair and are odorless, tasteless, indestructible fibers that can remain suspended in the air for seconds.

Global Asbestos Awareness Week Schedule  (Tentative)

Below is a  tentative schedule of events and contributing collaborators for the week.  We hope you will join us and look forward to having you tuned in for GAAW!

April 1: Open with Candlelight Vigil and 7 Reasons for 7 Days by Linda Reinstein

April 2: Global Asbestos Awareness Week Launch from Dr. Frank, “Why is Asbestos Bad for My Health?” and Dr. Richard, “Asbestos: What is It?”

April 3: Statement from the Collegium Ramazzini

April 4: Take 5 and Stay Alive from British Lung Foundation

April 5: Workers Safety from Health and Safety Executive

April 6: Review of the Landmark Italian Criminal Asbestos Trial from ADAO and John Newquist (OSHA), “If You Think It’s Asbestos, It Probably Is”

April 7: Communication, Collaboration, and Action from ADAO; Close with Candlelight Vigil

Linda Reinstein is ADAO’s President/CEO and Co-Founder. She presented at the 8th Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference on March 30 – April 1, 2012.

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ABOUT ADAO: Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO seeks to give asbestos victims and concerned citizens a united voice to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure. ADAO is an independent organization dedicated to preventing asbestos-related diseases through education, advocacy, and community. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

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